Coppice Worker

Lesser spotted coppice worker

(Homo sapien Vs.coppicei)

Where does the name come from?

The name Homo sapien is the term generally used for the human race with the name coppicei comes from the latin, the lesser spotted coppice worker (LSCW) was commonly found in all form of coppice throughout britain up until the 1960's. Since this time the population has fallen due mostly to loss of habitat and fall in income.

there are many sub species of this rare and elusive creature the main to found in the southeast of england being avellanarius the hazel coppice worker and Castanearius the Sweet chestnut coppice worker.

Life span

There are still many members of the species that are working in coppice into there 70's and 80's. The average age of the LSCW in the past 20 years has increased to about 45 with very few younger members of the species coming in.

Physical description

Although the coat may vary from place to place they are generally a little tatty round the edges with signs of burning and some rips.

Lesser spotted coppice worker with bill hook
The lesser spotted coppice worker in his natural enviroment using the tradition bill hook

They are generally found with either a billhook or chainsaw and are commonly found in the vicinity of a landrover or other 4×4.

Distribution

Once wide spread throughout Britain the distribution of the LSCW has been greatly diminished in the past 50 years, mainly due to the loss of habitat and the reduction in the use of coppice products such as hurdles and spars as well as the reduction in hedge laying and other traditional country crafts.

Behavior

Although they tend to be shy and elusive creatures spending most of there time deep in the woods they do occasionally escape to areas of conurbation to take part in farmers markets and other country shows where they sell the products, including Hurdles, charcoal, logs and kindling.

Little is know about the social behavior although it is thought that they spend some winter evenings and summer weekends displaying their wares at traditional craft events throughout Britain as well as meeting with other members of the species to chat and swap tails from the woods or marketing opportunities.

Conservation status

Although they are one of the rarest species in Britain there is no formal protection status although small groups LSCW have more recently started meeting up to try and protect there way of life and fight for recognition as a vital part of the British landscape.

This may be a bit a tong in cheek look at the coppice industry but next time you are walking in the woods remember it may just be a nice place to walk the dog to you, but to us it is our habitat and place of work and our way of life.